The Three Marks of Existence in Buddhism

The three marks of existence in buddhism

The Three Marks of Existence in Buddhism In previous articles I’ve mentioned the teaching of the Three Marks of Existence in Buddhism, but didn’t go into much detail so here I’ll go into more detail about what those are. So what are the Three Marks of Existence in Buddhism? In short, they are Impermanence (Anicca in Pali; Anitya in Sanskrit), Suffering (dukkha), and Non-Self (Anatta in Pali; Anatman in Sanskrit) and they describe the essential nature of conditioned existence. The Buddha taught: “Bhikkhus, whether Tathāgatas arise or not, there persists that law, that stableness of the Dhamma, that fixed course … Continue reading

Buddhas Third Noble Truth – The End of Suffering

buddhas third noble truth

Buddhas Third Noble Truth – The Truth of the Cessation or End of Suffering Now that we’ve identified the problem (First Noble Truth) and found the root cause of the problem (Second Noble Truth), we can move on to the Third Noble Truth of the cessation (nirodha) of dukkha (suffering, craving; pronounced doo-ka) which can be seen as the prognosis. Gautama Buddha realized under the Bodhi tree that everything that arises has a cause, no exceptions.  Not only this, but anything subject to arising is also subject to cessation (an end) which also includes dukkha (suffering, craving). Keep in mind … Continue reading

Buddhas First Noble Truth – The Truth of Suffering

buddhas first noble truth

The Buddhas First Noble Truth When Siddhartha sat under the Bodhi tree, he resolved that he would not rise until he found the way out of suffering. And when he rose after his enlightenment he came to the realization of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path. The Buddhas First Noble Truth (Arya satya in Sanskrit) is that all sentient beings are subject to Dukkha which is commonly translated as “suffering, pain, sorrow, misery” but it also has a deeper meaning of “unsatisfactoriness, frustration, seperation”. As Piyadassi Thera writes in the book “The Buddha’s Ancient Path” : “To the … Continue reading